Lichen sclerosus and morphea

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Lichen sclerosus and morphea

The predominant dermoscopic feature of lichen sclerosus are white-yellowish structureless areas, independently of the location. Genital lichen sclerosus commonly appear with linear vessels while extragenital lesions rather exhibit keratotic plugs, surrounded by an erythematous halo. This halo represents a marker of disease activity.[1][2] In morphea, linear vessels within the lilac ring are a typical finding in dermoscopy.[3]

By dermoscopical examination, lichen sclerosus is typified by comedo-like openings and whitish patches, whereas morphea exhibits fibrotic beams.[4]

  1. Larre Borges et al.: Clinical, dermoscopic and histopathologic features of genital and extragenital lichen sclerosus. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2013;27:1433-9. PMID: 22646723. DOI.
  2. Garrido-Ríos et al.: Dermoscopy of extragenital lichen sclerosus. Arch Dermatol 2009;145:1468. PMID: 20026867. DOI.
  3. Vázquez-López et al.: Dermoscopic semiology: further insights into vascular features by screening a large spectrum of nontumoral skin lesions. Br. J. Dermatol. 2004;150:226-31. PMID: 14996092.
  4. Shim et al.: Diagnostic usefulness of dermatoscopy in differentiating lichen sclerous et atrophicus from morphea. J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. 2012;66:690-1. PMID: 22421117. DOI.