Molluscum contagiusum

From dermoscopedia

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 Editor: Aimilios Lallas

 Author(s): Aimilios Lallas
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Description This chapter describes dermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. of molluscum contagiosumThis glossary term has not yet been described.
Author(s) Aimilios Lallas
Responsible author Aimilios Lallas→ send e-mail
Status released
Status update August 1, 2018
Status by Ralph P. Braun


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Molluscum contagiosumThis glossary term has not yet been described. is due to a poxvirus infectionThis glossary term has not yet been described. and has a characteristic dermoscopic pattern that may facilitate its clinical recognition in selected cases. DermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. is especially useful in detecting the infection before the development of numerous lesions, in pediatric dermatology, or in immunosuppressed patients who may display unusual clinical manifestations. A central pore or umbilication in conjunction with polylobular white to yellow amorphous structuresThis glossary term has not yet been described., surrounded by linear or branched vesselsarborizing vessels Bright red sharply in focus large or thick diameter vessels dividing into smaller vessels BCC (‘red corona’), compose the stereotypic dermoscopic pattern of the disease (Fig 9c).[1][2][3]
  1. Morales et al.: Dermoscopy of molluscum contagiosum. Arch Dermatol 2005;141:1644. PMID: 16365277. DOI.
  2. Zaballos et al.: Dermoscopy of molluscum contagiosum: a useful tool for clinical diagnosis in adulthood. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2006;20:482-3. PMID: 16643165. DOI.
  3. Ianhez et al.: Dermoscopic patterns of molluscum contagiosum: a study of 211 lesions confirmed by histopathology. An Bras Dermatol 2011;86:74-9. PMID: 21437525.