Parasitosis

From dermoscopedia

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 Editor: Aimilios Lallas

 Author(s): Aimilios Lallas
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Description DermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. of parasitosisThis glossary term has not yet been described.
Author(s) Aimilios Lallas
Responsible author Aimilios Lallas→ send e-mail
Status unknown
Status update September 12, 2017
Status by Ralph P. Braun


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Specific dermoscopic patternsThis glossary term has not yet been described. have been described for several infectiousThis glossary term has not yet been described. skin diseases, including those of viral, fungal and parasitic origin.[1]

Of note, use of the new-generations dermatoscopes that do not require direct contact to the skin minimizes the risk of transfection. Interestingly, while the risk of bacterial contamination with dermoscopic examination is reported to be low, viral transmission might still represent a possible problem.[2]
Dermoscopic criteria of infectious skin diseases.jpg
  1. Zalaudek et al.: Entodermoscopy: a new tool for diagnosing skin infections and infestations. Dermatology (Basel) 2008;216:14-23. PMID: 18032894. DOI.
  2. Penso-Assathiany et al.: Presence and persistence of human papillomavirus types 1, 2, 3, 4, 27, and 57 on dermoscope before and after examination of plantar warts and after cleaning. J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. 2013;68:185-6. PMID: 23244381. DOI.