Pigmented purpuric dermatoses

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Main PageInflammoscopyPigmented purpuric dermatoses
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 Authored by: Sabine Ludwig     ·  Aimilios Lallas

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Description This chapter describes dermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. of pigmented purpuric dermatoses
Author(s) Sabine Ludwig · Aimilios Lallas
Owner Aimilios Lallas→ send e-mail
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Status update July 11, 2017
Status by Ralph P. Braun


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Pigmented purpuric dermatoses

The term pigmented purpuric dermatoses comprehends the following entities: Schamberg’s disease, Majocchi purpura, eczematoid purpura of Doucas and Kapetanakis, lichen aureus and pigmented purpuric lichenoid dermatitisalso known as eczema is a group of diseases that results in inflammation of the skin. of Gougerot-Blum. Pigmented purpuric dermatoses are dermoscopically identified by the combinationThis glossary term has not yet been described. of purpuric dots or globules and orange-brown areas of pigmentation.[1][2] A similar dermoscopic pattern has been described in patients with mycosis fungoidesThis glossary term has not yet been described., supporting previous evidence reporting clinical and histopathologic overlap between the two entities.[3] Since the pigmented purpuric dermatoses and mycosis fungoides notably differ in physical course and managementThis glossary term has not yet been described., lesions showing a dermsocopic pattern of pigmented purpuric dermatoses should be evaluated carefully.



ReferencesThis is material contained in a footnote or bibliography holding further information.
  1. Zaballos et al.: DermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. of pigmented purpuric dermatoses (lichen aureus): a useful tool for clinical diagnosisis the identification of the nature and cause of a certain phenomenon. Diagnosis is used in many different disciplines with variations in the use of logic, analytics, and experience to determine "cause and effect". In systems engineering and computer science, it is typically used to determine the causes of symptoms, mitigations, and solutions. Arch Dermatol 2004;140:1290-1. PMID: 15492206. DOI.
  2. Zalaudek et al.: [Atypical clinical presentationThis glossary term has not yet been described. of pigmented purpuric dermatosis]. J Dtsch Dermatol Ges 2006;4:138-40. PMID: 16503941. DOI.
  3. Lallas et al.: Dermoscopy of early stage mycosis fungoides. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2013;27:617-21. PMID: 22404051. DOI.