Shiny white streaks

From dermoscopedia

5.00
(3 votes)

 Editor: Ralph P. Braun

Annotations
Description This chapter describes histopathological correlation of the dermoscopy term shiny white streaks
Author(s) Ralph P. Braun · Oriol Yélamos
Responsible author Ralph Braun→ send e-mail
Status unknown
Status update July 2, 2018
Status by Ralph P. Braun


User=

Christalline structures are white shiny linear streaks that are seen under polarized dermoscopy, but not under nonpolarized dermoscopy. The white streaks are oriented parallel, and sometimes also orthogonal (perpendicular) to each other. Chrysalis structures can be seen in scars, dermatofibromas, basal cell carcinomas, and also in melanomas and Spitz nevi. These structures correlate histopathologically with altered collagen in the dermis (fibrosis). The birefringent properties of collagen bundles cause rapid randomization of polarized light. This is the reason collagen appears bright white and more conspicuous under polarized dermoscopy [1].

An example of shiny white lines as they appear in polarized (right image) as opposed to non-polarized dermoscopy (left image):

Npd vs pd blue veils.JPG




Images for keyword "shiny white streaks"





References

  1. Verzi et al.: The diagnostic value and histologic correlate of distinct patterns of shiny white streaks for the diagnosis of melanoma: A retrospective, case-control study. J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. 2018;78:913-919. PMID: 29138058. DOI.