Structureless

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Definition: no basic elements, too few to constitute a pattern, or the visible structuresThis glossary term has not yet been described. cannot be assigned to one of the five basic elements.

Lesions that only have a structureless pattern are difficultneeding much effort or skill to accomplish to diagnose using dermatoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. and often require histopathologyThis glossary term has not yet been described..

One color predominates over all othersThis glossary term has not yet been described.This glossary term has not yet been described.

  • Black + structurelessThis glossary term has not yet been described.: presence of hemoglobin (not melanin) and its degradation products, e.g. hemorrhagic crusts, hemorrhages in the epidermis and thrombosed vesselsThis glossary term has not yet been described..
  • Differential diagnoses: heavily pigmented melanocyticThis glossary term has not yet been described. lesions, e.g. Reed nevusThis glossary term has not yet been described., Clark nevus or melanomaThis glossary term has not yet been described..
  • Blue + structureless: "blue neviThis glossary term has not yet been described." of all types.
  • Differential diagnoses: melanomas melanoma metastases, structureless blue pigmented basal cell carcinomas.
  • Brown + structureless: solar lentigoThis glossary term has not yet been described., flat seborrheic keratosisThis glossary term has not yet been described., pigmented Bowenalso known as squamous cell carcinoma in situ[1] is a neoplastic skin disease. It can be considered as an early stage or intraepidermal form of squamous cell carcinoma. It was named after John T. Bowen’s disease, melanocytic nevus of "superficialThis glossary term has not yet been described." or "superficial and deep" congenital type.
  • Red + structureless: recent hemorrhage in the stratum corneum. This will become a black structureless lesion as the hemoglobin degrades, before it entirely disappears due to transepidermal elimination.


More than one colorColor (American English) or colour (Commonwealth English) is the characteristic of human visual perception described through color categories, with names such as red, yellow, purple, or blue.

Difficultneeding much effort or skill to accomplish to decide whether clods or structureless. ClodsThis glossary term has not yet been described.: well circumscribed and always occur in numbers. StructurelessThis glossary term has not yet been described.: one large contiguous area.

  • ColorsThis glossary term has not yet been described. of keratin (yellow and orange): keratinizing lesions such as seborrheic keratosis.
  • Differential diagnoses: basal cell carcinomais the most common skin cancer, and one of the most common cancers in the United States.[1] While BCC has a very low metastatic risk, this tumor can cause significant disfigurement by invading surrounding tissues
  • Colors of hemoglobin (red and purple): hemorrhage, or hemorrhage in a pre-existing lesion such as a nevusThis glossary term has not yet been described..
  • Black zones in structureless lesion: thrombosis.
  • Differential diagnoses: black should be attributed to blood when it appears together with red or purple and attributed to melanin when it appears together with brown, blue or gray.
  • Symmetrical distribution of melanin: nevus.
  • Asymmetrical distribution of melanin: melanoma, melanoma metastasis, seborrheic keratosis.
  • Differential diagnosisis the identification of the nature and cause of a certain phenomenon. Diagnosis is used in many different disciplines with variations in the use of logic, analytics, and experience to determine "cause and effect". In systems engineering and computer science, it is typically used to determine the causes of symptoms, mitigations, and solutions: pigmented basal cell carcinomaThis glossary term has not yet been described. or a dermatofibromaDermatofibromas are hard solitary slow-growing papules (rounded bumps) that may appear in a variety of colours, usually brownish to tan; they are often elevated or pedunculated. A dermatofibroma is associated with the dimple sign; by applying lateral pressure, there is a central depression of the dermatofibroma..