Cutaneous larva migrans

From dermoscopedia

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 Editor: Aimilios Lallas

 Author(s): Aimilios Lallas
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Description This chapter describes the dermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. of cutaneous larva migransis a skin disease in humans, caused by the larvae of various nematode parasites of the hookworm family (Ancylostomatidae). The most common species causing this disease in the Americas is Ancylostoma braziliense. These parasites live in the intestines of dogs, cats, and wild animals and should not be confused with other members of the hookworm family for which humans are definitive hosts, namely Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus.
Author(s) Aimilios Lallas
Responsible author Aimilios Lallas→ send e-mail
Status released
Status update September 1, 2018
Status by Ralph P. Braun


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DermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. has been shown to facilitate the clinical recognition of larva migransThis glossary term has not yet been described. (creeping eruption), by revealing translucent brownish structureless areas in a segmental arrangementThis glossary term has not yet been described., corresponding to the body of the larva.[1]
  1. Veraldi et al.: Epiluminescence microscopy in cutaneous larva migrans. Acta Derm. Venereol. 2000;80:233. PMID: 10954233.