Pediculosis

From dermoscopedia

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 Editor: Aimilios Lallas

 Author(s): Aimilios Lallas
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Description This chapter descibes the dermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. of PediculosisThis glossary term has not yet been described.
Author(s) Aimilios Lallas
Responsible author Aimilios Lallas→ send e-mail
Status open
Status update May 14, 2018
Status by Ralph P. Braun


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DermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. allows a rapid and reliable diagnosisis the identification of the nature and cause of a certain phenomenon. Diagnosis is used in many different disciplines with variations in the use of logic, analytics, and experience to determine "cause and effect". In systems engineering and computer science, it is typically used to determine the causes of symptoms, mitigations, and solutions of pediculosisThis glossary term has not yet been described. by revealing the liceThis glossary term has not yet been described. itself or the nits fixed to the hair shaft (Fig 9b).[1][2]Nits containing vital nymphs dermoscopically display ovoid brown structuresThis glossary term has not yet been described., while the empty nits are translucent and typically show a plane and fissured free ending. This information is particularly useful for treatment monitoring, since dermoscopic detection of vital nits should lead to a continuation or modification of therapy. Additionally, dermoscopy has been recently shown to enable the discrimination between nits and the so-called pseudo-nits, such as hair casts, debris of hair spray or gel. The latter are not firmly attached to the hair shaft and appear dermoscopically as amorphous, whitish structures.[3]
  1. Micali et al.: Dermatoscopy: alternative uses in daily clinical practice. J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. 2011;64:1135-46. PMID: 21292346. DOI.
  2. Di Stefani et al.: Dermoscopy for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of pediculosis capitis. J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. 2006;54:909-11. PMID: 16635683. DOI.
  3. Zalaudek & Argenziano: Images in clinical medicine. Dermoscopy of nits and pseudonits. N. Engl. J. Med. 2012;367:1741. PMID: 23113485. DOI.