Blood vessels (scalp)

From dermoscopedia

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 Editor: Anna Waskiel Burnat

 Author(s): Anna Waskiel Burnat     ·  Lidia Rudnicka     ·  Adriana Rakowska
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Description This chapter describes the different types of blood vesselsare the part of the circulatory system, and microcirculation, that transports blood throughout the human bodyThis glossary term has not yet been described. that can be found on the scalpThis glossary term has not yet been described. using trichoscopyThis glossary term has not yet been described. (dermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. of the scalp)
Author(s) Anna Waskiel Burnat · Lidia Rudnicka · Adriana Rakowska
Responsible author Anna Waskiel Burnat→ send e-mail
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Status update March 29, 2019
Status by Ralph P. Braun


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Comma vesselslinear curved short vessels dermal nevi Dotted vesselstiny pinpoint vessels Hairpin vesselsThis glossary term has not yet been described. Elongated hairpin vessels Straight linear vesselsLinear mildly curved vessels considered irregular when different sizes shapes and curves with a haphazard or random distribution are presented and considered regular when short and fine (thin) linear vessels prevail various diagnoses Thin arborizing vesselsanalytic term is branched vessels; Bright red sharply in focus large or thick diameter vessels dividing into smaller vessels; BCC Thick arborizing vessels Capillary blood extravasations Concentric perifollicular vessels Milky red globulesThis glossary term has not yet been described. Linear helical vesselscorkscrew twisted looped vessels with bends twisted along a central axis melanoma metastasis Lace-like vessels Glomerular vessels Serpentine vesselslinear irregular vessels with multiple bends. Seen with flat BCC and melanoma Thick root-like vessels Vessel nets
C-shaped or slightly curved vesselscomma vessels - linear curved short vessels - dermal nevi monomorphous vessels: one type of vessel dominates Tiny, red dots densely aligned next to each other Small, linear looped vesselsmetaphoric term: hairpin vessels <br />

two parallel linear vessels forming a half looped or hairpin like structure <br />

seen in seborrheic keratosis viral warts
Elongated, linear looped vessels Straight linear vessels Thinner than the average terminal hair arborizing vessels Thicker than the average terminal hair arborizing vessels Round or oval, sharply demarcated, intensely red areas VesselsThis glossary term has not yet been described. (loops or linear) arranged concentrically around a follicular unit Globules or larger areas of a fuzzy or unfocused milky red color Linear vesselsLinear mildly curved vessels considered irregular when different sizes shapes and curves with a haphazard or random distribution are presented and considered regular when short and fine (thin) linear vessels prevail various diagnoses twisted along a central axis CombinationThis glossary term has not yet been described. of serpentine and looped vessels Coiled or twisted vessels Bending, scarcely branching vessels Thick, irregularly banded, linear vessels Interfollicular networkThis glossary term has not yet been described. of blood vessels
Inflammatory scalp diseases (seborrheic dermatitisThis glossary term has not yet been described., psoriasisThis glossary term has not yet been described.), healthy persons Healthy persons in the frontal area, eczema Healthy persons in the frontal area Cicatricial alopeciaThis glossary term has not yet been described. (lichen planopilarisThis glossary term has not yet been described., folliculitis decalvans), T-cell lymphomaThis glossary term has not yet been described. Pemphigus vulgaris Healthy persons (the occipital and temporal area), seborrheic dermatitis Discoid lupus erythematosusis a chronic skin condition of sores with inflammation and scarring favouring the face, ears, and scalp and at times on other body areas. These lesions develop as a red, inflamed patch with a scaling and crusty appearance. The centre areas may appear lighter in colour with a rim darker than the normal skin., basal cell carcinomais the most common skin cancer, and one of the most common cancers in the United States.[1] While BCC has a very low metastatic risk, this tumor can cause significant disfigurement by invading surrounding tissues Active psoriasis Cicatricial alopecia (lichen planopilaris, folliculitis decalvans) T-cell lymphoma, psoriasis PsoriasisThis glossary term has not yet been described., pemphigus, T-cell lymphoma Psoriasis Psoriasis Discoid lupus erythematosus Discoid lupus erythematosus, congenital capillary malformations Healthy persons, after topical corticosteroids



1. Rudnicka, L., et al., TrichoscopyThis glossary term has not yet been described. update 2011. J Dermatol Case Rep, 2011. 5(4): p. 82-8.
2. Rudnicka, L., et al., Hair shafts in trichoscopy: cluesEvidence, in an investigation for diagnosisis the identification of the nature and cause of a certain phenomenon. Diagnosis is used in many different disciplines with variations in the use of logic, analytics, and experience to determine "cause and effect". In systems engineering and computer science, it is typically used to determine the causes of symptoms, mitigations, and solutions of hair and scalp diseases. Dermatol Clin, 2013. 31(4): p. 695-708, x.
3. Inui, S., et al., Clinical significance of dermoscopy in alopecia areataThis glossary term has not yet been described.: analysis of 300 cases. Int J Dermatol, 2008. 47(7): p. 688-93.
4. Kowalska-Oledzka, E., et al., 'Black dotsDots are small, round structures of less than 0.1 mm in diameter that have a red color when corresponding to blood vessels; however, when due to melanin, their color ranges from black, brown, to blue-gray depending on the depth and concentration of the melanin in the skin (Tyndall effect).' seen under trichoscopy are not specific for alopecia areata. Clin Exp Dermatol, 2012. 37(6): p. 615-9.
5. Rakowska, A., et al., Trichoscopy of cicatricial alopeciaThis glossary term has not yet been described.. J Drugs Dermatol, 2012. 11(6): p. 753-8.
6. Rakowska, A., et al., New trichoscopy findings in trichotillomaniaThis glossary term has not yet been described.: flame hairs, V-sign, hook hairs, hair powder, tulip hairs. Acta Derm Venereol, 2014. 94(3): p. 303-6.
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9. Karadag Kose, O. and A.T. Gulec, Clinical evaluation of alopecias using a handheld dermatoscopeThis traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections.. J Am Acad Dermatol, 2012. 67(2): p. 206-14.
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11. Chiramel, M.J., et al., Relevance of trichoscopy in the differential diagnosis of alopecia: A cross-sectional study from North India. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol, 2016. 82(6): p. 651-658.
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13. Rudnicka, L., M. Olszewska, and A. Rakowska, Atlas of trichoscopy: dermoscopy in hair and scalp disease. 2012, London: Springer.
14. Rakowska, A., et al., DermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. in female androgenic alopecia: method standardization and diagnostic criteriameasure of how well one variable or set of variables predicts an outcome. Int J Trichology, 2009. 1(2): p. 123-30.
15. Inui, S., Trichoscopy for common hair loss diseases: algorithmic method for diagnosis. J Dermatol, 2011. 38(1): p. 71-5.
16. Tosti, A., et al., Follicular red dots: a novel dermoscopic pattern observed in scalp discoid lupus erythematosusis a chronic skin condition of sores with inflammation and scarring favouring the face, ears, and scalp and at times on other body areas. These lesions develop as a red, inflamed patch with a scaling and crusty appearance. The centre areas may appear lighter in colour with a rim darker than the normal skin.. Arch Dermatol, 2009. 145(12): p. 1406-9.
17. Waskiel, A., et al., Trichoscopy of alopecia areata: An update. J Dermatol, 2018.
18. Rakowska, A., Trichoscopy (hair and scalp videodermoscopy) in the healthy female. Method standardization and norms for measurable parameters. J Dermatol Case Rep, 2009. 3(1): p. 14-9.