Bowen's disease

From dermoscopedia

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 Authored by: Florentia Dimitriou     ·  Teresa Deinlein     ·  Iris Zalaudek

 Keywords:   bowen · squamous cell carcinoma · in situ
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Description In this chapter we describe the dermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. criteriameasure of how well one variable or set of variables predicts an outcome of Squamous cell carcinomaThis glossary term has not yet been described. in situThis glossary term has not yet been described. (Bowenalso known as squamous cell carcinoma in situ[1] is a neoplastic skin disease. It can be considered as an early stage or intraepidermal form of squamous cell carcinoma. It was named after John T. Bowen's Disease)
Author(s) Florentia Dimitriou · Teresa Deinlein · Iris Zalaudek
Owner Iris Zalaudek→ send e-mail
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Status update June 19, 2017
Status by Ralph P. Braun


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Non-pigmentedThis glossary term has not yet been described. Bowen’s disease

Bowen’s disease represents an intraepithelial carcinoma or in situ Squamous cell carcinoma (SCCThis glossary term has not yet been described.). The most frequent clinical presentationThis glossary term has not yet been described. is an erythematous scaly patch or slightly elevated plaque.

The archetypal dermoscopic pattern of BD is characterized by two types of vascular patternsThis glossary term has not yet been described.:

  • Clustered vascular pattern: Focal, clustered, asymmetric distribution of the vesselsThis glossary term has not yet been described.
  • Glomerular (coiled) vessels: Tortuous capillaries, which are larger than dotted vesselstiny pinpoint vessels flat melanocytic lesions inflammatory diseases Bowen disease and are often distributed in clusters mimicking the glomerular apparatus of the kidney.

The concurrent presence of hyperkeratosis (surface scale) allows a high diagnostic probability.


Bowen's disease Glomerular vessels & Scales Yugulum Female 83 yrs Derm 2.jpg

Figure: Bowen's disease with glomerular vesselsThis glossary term has not yet been described. and scales.

Pigmented Bowen’s disease

Pigmented Bowen’s disease (pBD) is more frequently described in darker skin phenotypes.

The following dermoscopic criteria are suggested to be a specific clue for the diagnosisis the identification of the nature and cause of a certain phenomenon. Diagnosis is used in many different disciplines with variations in the use of logic, analytics, and experience to determine "cause and effect". In systems engineering and computer science, it is typically used to determine the causes of symptoms, mitigations, and solutions of pBD:

  • Brown or grey dotsDots are small, round structures of less than 0.1 mm in diameter that have a red color when corresponding to blood vessels; however, when due to melanin, their color ranges from black, brown, to blue-gray depending on the depth and concentration of the melanin in the skin (Tyndall effect).: these dots are a strong clue when arranged as linear radial lines at the periphery of the lesion
  • Pink or skin colored eccentric structureless areas
  • Glomerular (coiled) vessels, arranged randomly, as clusters, or in radial linesstreaksThis glossary term has not yet been described.



ReferencesThis is material contained in a footnote or bibliography holding further information.

  1. An Atlas of DermoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections., Second Edition. Marghoob A. et al. CRC Press; 2012.
  2. Bugatti, L., Filosa, G. & De Angelis, R., 2004, Dermoscopic observation of Bowen’s disease. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol, 18, 572–4.
  3. Bugatti, L., Filosa, G. & De Angelis, R., 2007, The specific dermoscopical criteria of Bowen’s disease. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol, 21, 700–1.
  4. Cameron A., Rosendahl C., Tschandl P., Riedl E., Kittler H., 2010, DermatoscopyThe examination of [skin lesions] with a 'dermatoscope'. This traditionally consists of a magnifier (typically x10), a non-polarised light source, a transparent plate and a liquid medium between the instrument and the skin, and allows inspection of skin lesions unobstructed by skin surface reflections. Modern dermatoscopes dispense with the use of liquid medium and instead use polarised light to cancel out skin surface reflections. of pigmented Bowen’s disease. J Am Acad Dermatol, 62, 597–604.
  5. Stante, M., De Giorgi, V., Massi, D., Chiarugi, A. & Carli, P., 2004, Pigmented Bowen’s disease mimicking cutaneous melanomaThis glossary term has not yet been described.: clinical and dermoscopic aspects. Dermatol Surg, 30, 541–4.
  6. Zalaudek, I. & Argenziano, G., 2004, Glomerular vesselsThis glossary term has not yet been described. in Bowen’s disease. Br J Dermatol, 151, 720.
  7. Zalaudek, I., Argenziano, G., Leinweber, B., et al., 2004, Dermoscopy of Bowen’s disease. Br J Dermatol, 150, 1112–16.
  8. Zalaudek, I., Di Stefani, A. & Argenziano, G., 2006a, The specific dermoscopic criteria of Bowen’s disease. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol, 20, 361–2.